1. Masturbation is a great way to love and learn about your body.
    Before you get intimate with someone, you should get intimate with yourself. You should learn what you like when you’re on your own, because once you’re with another person, it will be really easy to just focus on what they like and what works for them (especially if that person has a penis, which, generally speaking, is a much simpler machine to operate). Try lube, try a little vibrator, try closing your eyes and listening to music. And don’t worry if you can’t bring yourself to orgasm at first ― these things take time.

    — Em and Lo from “Top 10 Things We Will Tell Our Daughters About Sexvia Huffington Post (via bedsider)

  2. 10 intriguing female revolutionaries that you didn’t learn about in History class →

    revolutionary-afrolatino:

    women are the backbone of revolutionary movements!

  3. 25 days since Mike Brown was killed.

    hasdarrenwilsonbeenarrestedyet:

    Jeff Roorda defends police officer video taped punching handcuffed teenager.. Also says that video should only be used to protect police. Watch the video all the way to the end.

  4. micdotcom:

    No, ‘Flight of the Conchords’ aren’t returning to HBO — but here are 7 reasons why they really should 

    3. Bret & Jemaine’s charity gig was better than the ice bucket challenge.

    The ‘Chords’ 2012 single benefitting Cure Kids was, to say the least, much funnier than watching a bunch of people you knew in high school pour water over their heads.

    Weird Al’s success is a game changer Follow micdotcom

  5. “Sex negative” and “sex positive” are relatively useless terms in terms of discussing feminist approaches to issues of sex and sexuality. The terms convey the message that “sex positivity” equals support for a vision of sex and sexuality that is defined by patriarchy and one that is primarily libertarian. What’s defined as “sex positive feminism” tends to translate to: non-critical of the sex industry, BDSM, burlesque, and generally, anything that can be related to “sex.” “Non-judgement” is the mantra espoused by so-called “sex-positive feminists,” which is troubling because it ends up framing critical thought and discourse as “judgement” and therefore negative. Since I tend to see critical thinking as a good thing, the “don’t judge me”/”don’t say anything critical about sex because it’s sex and therefore anything goes” thing doesn’t sit well with me.

    “Sex negative,” on the other hand, tends to be ascribed to feminists who are critical of prostitution, pornography, strip clubs, burlesque, BDSM and, really, sex and sexuality as defined by patriarchy and men. The reason that feminists are critical of these things is because they want to work towards a real, liberated, feminist understanding of sex and sexuality, rather than one that sexualizes inequality, domination and subordination, is male-centered, and is harmful and exploitative of women. To me, that sounds far more “sex positive” (from a feminist perspective, anyway), than blind support for anything sex-related, because sex.

    — 

    The divide isn’t between ‘sex negative’ and ‘sex positive’ feminists — it’s between liberal and radical feminism (via feministcurrent)

    it ends up framing critical thought and discourse as “judgement” and therefore negative. Since I tend to see critical thinking as a good thing, the “don’t judge me”/”don’t say anything critical about sex because it’s sex and therefore anything goes” thing doesn’t sit well with me…The reason that feminists are critical of these things is because they want to work towards a real, liberated, feminist understanding of sex and sexuality, rather than one that sexualizes inequality, domination and subordination, is male-centered, and is harmful and exploitative of women. To me, that sounds far more “sex positive” (from a feminist perspective, anyway), than blind support for anything sex-related, because sex.

    (via mangoestho)

  6. You can fit two thousand four hundred and ninety six
    tiny letter a’s on an a4 page
    based on fitting four of them firmly into the space of a
    centimetre square.
    Dad will say, “That’s diligence for you.”
    Everyone else will call it a waste of time.

    You can fit a whole tube of Smarties in your mouth
    while dressing your little brother up in your Sunday best.
    Grandma will laugh at the boy in the dress.
    Granddad will nearly hit someone.
    Your brother will be sent upstairs to change
    head bowed in shame.
    No one will notice the Smarties.

    Mum says 56 bad words on the phone to Jamaica.
    She is not impressed when you tell her so.
    “Keep out of adult conversations,” she warns,
    her mouth growing tight.
    The pastor makes twenty-four references to hell
    in the sermon at church and forgets to talk
    about love. Granddad falls asleep.

    If your bible has pictures
    you should colour them in and count
    how many men in the church wear white socks and black shoes.
    Count the bitten fingernails and
    how many people cry silently during prayer.

    Count the number of cars that afternoon before your mother,
    tired and lovely, pulls up on the pavement to collect you.
    Count how many people shake their head
    at her red nails, her tight jeans.
    She looks like a star and they’re jealous.

    You can fit the word lonely
    four hundred and sixteen times
    on the back of that same piece of paper.
    Dad will say, “Don’t be silly. Your brother will be out of hospital soon.”
    Mum will be too stressed to talk.
    You will go to live at Grandma’s, spending days drinking Rooibos out of eggs cups,
    studying God’s word and watching the sun.

    You will learn to fear
    The Most High
    also
    count how many times the
    King James Bible uses the words, thee, thou and thy.
    Keep a proper tally. Granddad can play any song on the harmonica.
    Test him. He likes to be tested
    (until he doesn’t know the answer.)
    Then he will get angry
    and say things he doesn’t mean.

    There are one hundred and twenty seven roses
    on the wallpaper in your new room.
    There were more than that but you picked some away.
    Your brother has been gone now for two months straight and
    nobody will tell you anything.
    Count how many
    family friends are praying for you.
    There are sixty-four red grapes on the bunch
    Eat one after the other, fast
    without stopping.
    Maybe you can visit the hospital too.

    — 

    'kid'

    Yrsa Daley-Ward, ‘bone.’

    now available at amazon.com

    (via yrsadaleyward)

    absolutely. incredible.

    (via nayyirahwaheed)

  7. He says ‘I don’t get it, why are you still a virgin at 24?’

    He says ‘I don’t believe you, I’ve seen you walk, virgins don’t walk like that’

    He says, ‘That ain’t natural, people are supposed to fuck.’

    He asks ‘Why though? No offence though.’

    I ask ‘When was your first time?’

    He says ‘I was 12’

    He says ‘I know what you’re thinking, that’s too young.’

    I look at his knuckles, he has two good hands.

    He says ‘She was older than me.’

    I ask ‘How old?’

    And he says ‘It’s better that the girl is older, that’s how I learnt all things I know’

    He licks his lips.

    I ask again ‘How old?’

    He says ‘I could use one finger to make you sob’

    I think of my brother in prison and I can’t remember his face.

    I ask again ‘How old?’

    He says ‘Boys become men in the laps of women, you know?’

    I think of my mother’s face lined with her bad choices in men.

    He says ‘If you were mine you wouldn’t get away with this shit, I’d eat you for hours, I’d gut you like fruit.’

    I think of my cousin’s circumcision, how he feels like a mermaid, not human from the waist down.

    He says ‘I’d look after you, you know?’

    I laugh, I ask for the last time ‘How old?’

    He says ‘34.’

    He says ‘She was beautiful though and I know what you’re thinking but it’s not like that, I’m a man, I’m a man, I’m a man. No one could ever hurt me’.

    — Warsan Shire, Crude Conversations With Boys Who Fake Laughter Often (via lerafew)

    (Source: cactuslungs)

  8. The world is full of nice people. If you can’t find one, be one.

    — Unknown (via psych-facts)

  9. carlboygenius:

    BETTY BOOP - The Original Story

    Ms. Esther Jones, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem.


    Ms. Jones singing style went on to become the inspiration for Max Fleischer cartoon character’s voice and singing style of “Betty Boop”.

    YES: “Betty Boop” was a black woman. 

    Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and copied it, stole it. Ms. Jones’ “trademark” singing style for a recording of, “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” with interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in her songs at a cabaret was a style all her own. 

    An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. During the $250,000 infringement lawsuit, Esther’s manager testified that , “Helen Kane & her manager saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.” 

    Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.

    As an added note, scholar Robert G.O’Meally said, Betty Boop, the WHITE CARTOON character herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her background. 

    Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.